Mad Max: Fury Road

Tom Hardy

Charlize Theron

reviewed by Tom-Tom

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Film Critic, the late Roger Ebert began his review of “Mad Max: Beyond Thunderdome” with the disclaimer, and I paraphrase “It’s not supposed to happen this way. The third movie in a trilogy isn’t supposed to be the best.” I didn’t agree with him that it was the best. I thought that “The Road Warrior” ie Mad Max 2 was the best because of the relentless chase, the totally cool punk hair, costumes, and vehicles of the bad guys, and that little kid with the boomerang all came together for a non-stop yet well balanced adventure. Now I have to quote Mr. Ebert. It’s not supposed to happen this way. The fourth film made thirty years, yes, count ’em thirty years after its predecessor isn’t supposed to be this good. It’s sure as hell not supposed to be the best movie of the entire series. It’s not supposed to feature one of the first actors (Hugh Keays-Byrne)  from the first film in an unrecognizable Bane-like mask with Back to the Future Doc’s shock of white hair and slightly more eye makeup than he wore as Toe Cutter. It’s not supposed to have a different actor playing Max without being a reboot. All of this isn’t supposed to happen, but it does. George Miller reminds us that he is alive and well and can still make a freaking masterpiece. Continue reading

Mad Max: Beyond Thunderdome

Mel Gibson

Tina Turner

reviewed by Tom-Tom

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After the completely awesome and mold breaking second Mad Max film, George Miller has his own big shoes to fill. Every single post-apocalyptic novel, show, movie, or video game has benefited from the standards set in that landmark film. So with a budget thrice the size of the second picture and 24 times the first one, what will George Miller (and co-director George Ogilvie) bring us this time? Will he take Mad Max down the “more budget than story” route so many series have to its destruction or whip out a new entry into the canon that will outshine the rest?

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Mad Max

Mel Gibson

Hugh Keays-Byrne

reviewed by Tom-Tom

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In anticipation of the 4th Mad Max film which will debut in Japan June 19th, 2015, thirty years after the third film, I decided to go back to the beginning of it all and see what exactly Mad Max is all about. The film begins with orchestral tension playing something between Bernard Herman’s “Psycho” theme and any one of Lalo Schiffrin’s 70’s themes. A high speed chase is in progress and police officers are in pursuit. The cop cars have things like Interceptor and Pursuit written on their backs. The terrain is desert like, forlorn looking, must be Australia (or Nevada). The cars are all right hand drive and the escaping perpetrator screams into the police radio ( it is a cop car he has stolen with his wild girlfriend) that he is the Nightrider in a “gas-fueled suicide machine” sounding more like an announcer for an inappropriate Monster Truck Commercial than anything else. There are some terrible car crashes and near misses with the suspense and action hyped up pretty high before our hero steps in. Mel Gibson looks super youthful and nowhere as intimidating as post 90’s Mel. All the brief glimpses leading up to his affable Joe College appearance are a bit of a let down. We’re expecting a badass not an All-American starting quarterback.

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