Mission: Impossible-Ghost Protocol

Tom Cruise

Paula Patton

reviewed by Tom-Tom

starstarstarstar

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V0LQnQSrC-g 

The Mission Impossible film series is unique in that each film has been shaped by a different director. Brad Bird is the fourth director to tackle the franchise. He brings with him his considerable talents for stylized silence, humor, gadgetry, action and dramatic cinematography in a cool spy film which is fun, shocking, and satisfying.

The film opens unusually for a Mission Impossible after a rather exciting opener from two people we don’t know stealing from and killing one another. The scene changes and we get what looks like security camera footage of a Russian prison in which the doors are electronically locked with clear red lights for closed and green for open. Suddenly one door opens and a giant tattooed thug walks free into the hall not believing his luck. It’s got a bit of teatre d’absurtite feel to it. We soon realize the doors were opened by Benji (Simon Pegg) who only had two rather funny yet memorable cameos in the third film. Pegg is such a natural comic actor with a very expressive face demonstrating shock, annoyance, confusion in a series of rather funny faces as he plays around opening cell block after cell block and looks on using his many faces as things take a turn he wasn’t expecting. Ethan Hunt IMF (Impossible Mission Force) Agent is also in the prison for reasons we know not. As Benji takes the hacker’s high road, an unknown female agent (the kickass and beautiful Jane Carter played by Paula Patton) takes the subterranean low road while keeping in constant contact with him. Ethan defers from the easiest path of escape and seeks to help another unknown character Bogdan, a string-haired bearded man who calls Hunt Sergei, escape.

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Mission: Impossible

Tom Cruise

Jon Voight

reviewed by Tom-Tom

starstarstarhalf star

The Mission Impossible film series is unique in that each film has been shaped by a different director. Brian De Palma is the first director to tackle the franchise. He brings with him his considerable talents for stylized silence, action and dramatic cinematography in a cool spy film which is complex, shocking, and suspenseful.

The film opens in Kiev with Emilio Estevez watching a lurid scene through via his computer. Two Russian men are conversing in their native tongue concerning a woman lying dead in a bed covered with blood. The older, well dressed man is attempting to needle out a name from the distressed younger one. He gets it, feeds him drugged vodka which knocks him out almost immediately. The walls are slid back and agents from the Impossible Mission Force (IMF) come forth to revive the “dead” woman, incarcerate the unconscious unlikely informant, and clean up the scene. The older Russian is revealed to be Tom Cruise  playing Agent Ethan Hunt after removing his high end rubber mask.

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Mission: Impossible III

Tom Cruise

Michelle Monaghan

reviewed by Tom-Tom

starstarstarhalf star

The Mission Impossible film series is unique in that each film has been shaped by a different director. J.J. Abrams is the third director to tackle the franchise. He brings with him his considerable talents for rapid fire dialogue and scenes with shocking non-sequiturs both in speech and action in a hit sequel which is light on details and high on action and suspense. It begins suspensefully trumping any scene you’ve come to expect from the Mission Impossible Series. It seems to be borrowing more from TV’s 24 more than anything.

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Mission: Impossible II

Tom Cruise

Ving Rhames

reviewed by Tom-Tom

starstar

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vIpqpRuGrq4 

The Mission Impossible film series is unique in that each film has been shaped by a different director. John Woo is the second director to tackle the franchise. He brings with him his considerable talents for action and dramatic cinematography in a hit and miss sequel which is light (very very light) on character development but high on action and suspense. There are few too many slow motion sequences which worked very well in, say, The Killer and A Better Tomorrow but feel rather dated and cheesy here. One Woo characteristic I may never reconcile is his love of pigeons and doves flying in slow motion in the middle of a battle. How do the bug-eyed little blighters always find the time to visit a shoot-out?

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Mission Impossible: Rogue Nation

Tom Cruise

Simon Pegg

reviewed by Tom-Tom

starstarstar

 

The Mission Impossible film series is unique in that each film has been shaped by a different director. Christopher McQuarrie is the fifth director and screenwriter team (of one) to tackle the franchise. The presence of a true wordsmith is apparent in the hearing following the opening scene where Tom Cruise as Ethan Hunt, the Impossible Mission Force (IMF) veteran who’s been doing this for at least 20 years, says more with a glance than others could with paragraphs after hanging on for dear life to a military jumbo jet while it takes off. In the hearing, William Brandt (Jeremy Renner) IMF field coordinator and Alan Hunley (Alec Baldwin) Director of the CIA are arguing for the future of the IMF cutting each other off and talking over one another. Baldwin as Hunley proves he hasn’t lost his effective gift for convincing diction. When he talks, we listen to his every word and McQuarrie’s excellent words make it a pleasure for us.

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